A Bleeding Light's Corner

A Bleeding Light's Corner

Fuji Pro 400H, Canon Elan 7e, 1/60, f/1.4 on Nikkor 50mm f/1.4

Growing up in a family line of photographers, I always hated learning about the rules of composition and lighting. I was more concerned with my dreams of becoming a Film Director. In film school, however, I learned that I was a couple steps ahead of my class when it came to cinematography and celluloid production. For this reason, it turns out, I enjoyed cinematography and learned to respect and love photography as the art it is.

 

In society, I find that distraction leads a generation of ADHD-riddled young adults. With our current technologies we seem to have a shorter attention span than previous generations, and I am no black sheep. Short television shows, social media, and ever growing technologies give way to short attention spans, social anxieties, and an ever growing dependency on said technologies. Through my photography, I utilize 35mm film to push myself to contemplate my subjects, consider my surroundings, and take my time on my shots, as how my grandfather did before me.

 

In this photograph, we witness distraction from art as a subject within itself. Due to the modern technologies embedded within our culture, we no longer contemplate on art, rather snap a quick picture on a cell phone and move on to the next installation. Taken in The Metropolitan Museum of Art, we are distracted from the three lights, in the same way that the subject is distracted from the three lights.